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15 11, 2017

Trick of the Trade: Topical Treatment of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

2017-11-15T13:59:07+00:00

A 23-year-old female with no past medical history presents to the ED for the 4th time this month complaining of severe “10-out-of-10” abdominal pain, nausea, and intractable vomiting. She denies alcohol use, but reports she has smoked at least 1 marijuana “bud” daily for the last 3 years. In an attempt to relieve her symptoms, she has increased her marijuana use, however she has found that her pain is actually increasing, and the only thing that appears to help is taking a hot shower or bath. With this statement, the provider immediately considers cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS).

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13 11, 2017

Pediatric Trick of the Trade: Finger Immobilization Technique

2017-11-13T10:18:47+00:00

A 3 year-old boy presents with a deep laceration of the distal phalanx, through the nail bed, after slamming his fingers in a car door. He is crying, anxious, and uncooperative. How do you make this situation easier to evaluate and repair?

Nail bed and finger laceration repairs can be challenging, and even more challenging in young patients. Preparation is key to getting a good outcome. Here we present a pediatric trick of the trade on immobilizing a finger for digit or nail bed procedures.

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31 07, 2017

Trick of the Trade: DIY Squirt Bottle Wound Irrigation

2017-07-30T14:37:24+00:00

wound irrigationWound irrigation is arguably one of the most important steps in closing a laceration, because all lacerations should be considered to be contaminated. Irrigation is considered the foundation in preventing infection. A common way to cleanse a wound is to irrigate a wound using a 20 cc syringe, angiocatheter, and splash protector. To achieve 500 cc of irrigation, however, it would require 25 syringe refills! Is there a better, cost-effective alternative?
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26 07, 2017

Trick of the Trade: Gaze Testing Using “Selfie Mode” on Your Smartphone Camera

2017-07-26T10:35:49+00:00

gaze testingThe NIH Stroke Scale is used to assess the severity of a suspected stroke. It includes 11 neurologic exam components that can be quickly performed at the bedside. The second component of the NIH Stroke Scale is testing of voluntary horizontal eye movements, a.k.a., “best gaze”.1 Gaze is usually tested by instructing the patient to follow the examiner’s hand or pointer finger in a horizontal plane from side to side. This assessment assumes that the patient can comprehend instructions and actively participate in the physical exam.

But… how do you test gaze if your patient is aphasic or unable to follow commands?
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4 06, 2017

Trick of the Trade: Using Linear Transducers for Point of Care Ultrasound in Intrauterine Pregnancy Evaluation

Ultrasound Intrauterine PregnancyThe volume of women presenting to the emergency department (ED) with newly diagnosed first-trimester pregnancies and suspected ectopic pregnancies sometimes seems like an infinitely growing number. As ED physicians, proper identification of an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) in these patients is of paramount importance and the initial imaging test of choice for many has become bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS).

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4 06, 2017

Trick of the Trade: Linear Transducers for Point of Care Ultrasound in Intrauterine Pregnancy Evaluation

2017-07-19T00:05:47+00:00

Ultrasound in Intrauterine PregnancyThe volume of women presenting to the emergency department (ED) with newly diagnosed first-trimester pregnancies and suspected ectopic pregnancies sometimes seems like an infinitely growing number. As ED physicians, proper identification of an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) in these patients is of paramount importance and the initial imaging test of choice for many has become bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS).

(more…)

4 06, 2017

Trick of the Trade: Using Linear Transducers for Point of Care Ultrasound in Pregnancy Evaluation

2017-06-04T21:05:28+00:00

Ultrasound Intrauterine PregnancyThe volume of women presenting to the emergency department (ED) with newly diagnosed first-trimester pregnancies and suspected ectopic pregnancies sometimes seems like an infinitely growing number. As ED physicians, proper identification of an intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) in these patients is of paramount importance and the initial imaging test of choice for many has become bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS).

(more…)