About Michelle Lin, MD

ALiEM Founder and CEO
Professor and Digital Innovation Lab Director
Department of Emergency Medicine
University of California, San Francisco

Article review: Preparing for clinical clerkships during medical school

TurtleScaredsmDo you remember the sheer terror you felt, when you first started your medical school clinical rotations? Your first two years were probably spent in classrooms and small-group labs discussing anatomy, pharmacology, pathology, etc.

Then BAM! You are thrown into the deep end of the pool. You are now on a clinical team of medical professionals taking care of actual patients!

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By |2016-11-11T19:01:26-08:00Apr 5, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|

Paucis Verbis card: ABG interpretation

ABG interpretationI have yet to find a better arterial blood gas interpretation review article than the 1991 Western Journal of Medicine summary by Dr. Rick Haber.

This installment of the Paucis Verbis (In a Few Words) e-card series reviews ABG Interpretation. The recent addition of an ABG machine in our ED has made a tremendous difference in our ability to care for undifferentiated patients. This is a refresher in making heads and tails of mixed acid-base disorders.

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By |2019-01-28T23:44:32-08:00Apr 2, 2010|ALiEM Cards, Endocrine-Metabolic, Pulmonary|

What do you do with old posters?

PostersHallIn academia, it is common practice to make posters of your abstracts for national conferences. Once you are done presenting, what DO people do with the posters? I have several posters rolled up in my garage collected over the years.

If the answer is nothing, why can’t we find a more creative way to display static (or even video) content during abstract sessions? Perhaps use a large LCD screen instead of posters taped to a backboard?

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By |2016-11-11T19:01:27-08:00Apr 1, 2010|Medical Education|

Tricks of the trade: Anesthetizing the nasopharyngeal tract

Nasogastric tube placement is one of the most uncomfortable procedures in the Emergency Department. Why can’t we find a painless way to do this?

Now that I am doing more fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopes, this issue is coming up more and more frequently. I’ve been using NP scopes mainly to check for laryngeal edema in the setting of angioedema. These recent photos visualize a normal epiglottis and normal laryngeal anatomy, respectively.

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By |2016-11-11T19:01:27-08:00Mar 31, 2010|Tricks of the Trade|

Great teaching video: Corneal FB removal

FBCorneasmPatients often come into the ED for eye pain. One of my favorite procedures is removal of a small foreign body embedded in the cornea. There is a great instructional video on removing such foreign bodies and the use of a ophthalmic burr on removing rust rings.

The video recommends using either a 30-gauge or 18-gauge needle. I prefer the less innocuous-looking 29-gauge insulin/TB needle. Can you imagine someone coming towards your eye with a large 18-gauge needle?!

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By |2019-01-28T23:44:07-08:00Mar 30, 2010|Ophthalmology|

Article review: The future of EM

CrystalBallsmAs I was perusing through a recent Academic Medicine journal, I came across this interesting perspective piece on Emergency Medicine, written by national leaders in our specialty.

This article essentially states that how the nation addresses ED crowding will define the future of EM. Currently, Emergency Departments are at a breaking point where overwhelming demands are commonly placed on under-resourced practices.

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By |2016-11-11T19:01:27-08:00Mar 29, 2010|Education Articles, Medical Education|