PV Card: Focused Abdominal Aorta Ultrasound

Ultrasound

In this next ultrasound installment in the PV Card series, Drs. Victoria Koskenoja, Heidi Kimberly, and Mike Stone succinctly summarize the focused abdominal aorta ultrasound to assess for an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). These can serve as key reference cards when you do your next AAA scan. Don’t miss the last card with tips on optimizing the view and common pitfalls.

PV Card: Focused Abdominal Aorta Ultrasound


Go to ALiEM (PV) Cards for more resources.

By |2021-10-06T10:07:34-07:00Sep 13, 2014|ALiEM Cards, Cardiovascular|

PV Card: FAST Ultrasound

Ultrasound

Keeping in line with the recent ultrasound posts this month, Dr. Mike Stone’s star team is releasing a series of Paucis Verbis cards on the basics of bedside ultrasonography. Here is the first in the series on the Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) by Drs. Wilma Chan, John Eicken, and Mike Stone.

PV Card: FAST Ultrasound


Go to ALiEM (PV) Cards for more resources.

By |2021-10-06T10:09:27-07:00Sep 12, 2014|ALiEM Cards, Ultrasound|

US4TW Case: 28F with Shortness of Breath

Welcome to the inaugural post for an exciting new ultrasound-based case series called “Ultrasound For The Win!” (#US4TW). In this peer-reviewed case series, we will focus on real clinical cases where bedside ultrasound changed the management or aided in the diagnosis. In our first case, we present a 28-year-old female with shortness of breath.

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Small bowel obstruction: Diagnosis by ultrasonography

SBOuprightA 64 year old man with an extensive history of abdominal surgeries presents to the emergency department with abdominal pain and vomiting. Because you suspect a bowel obstruction, you bring an ultrasound machine to the bedside prior to the completion of any laboratory testing or other imaging. A curvilinear probe in the abdominal mode setting was used to scan in all four quadrants of the abdomen looking in both the sagittal and transverse planes.

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Beta Blockers vs Calcium Channel Blockers for Atrial Fibrillation Rate Control: Thinking Beyond the ED

AFibIntravenous beta blockers and non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers are recommended first-line for atrial fibrillation (AF) with rapid ventricular rate (RVR) [1]. In a previous post, Bryan Hayes (@PharmERToxGuy) provided an overview of the data comparing beta blockers to calcium channel blockers for atrial fibrillation rate control in the ED. Here is part 2 of our two-part AF series.   (more…)

By |2022-02-10T10:55:56-08:00Sep 8, 2014|Cardiovascular, Tox & Medications|

I am giving prochlorperazine. Should I give diphenhydramine too?

BenadrylProchlorperazine is a commonly used medication in EM. In certain patients prochlorperazine does wonders for migraines, and remains a great antiemetic choice for undifferentiated nausea/vomiting when ondansetron is ineffective. However, prochlorperazine has antidopinamergic activity increasing the chances of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), such as akathisia, dystonia, parkinsonism, and rarely tardive dyskinesia. A common practice in the ED is to give diphenhydramine with prochlorperazine to attenuate EPS.  Does this really work? What is the evidence?

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By |2019-02-19T18:41:26-08:00Sep 3, 2014|Tox & Medications|

Diagnose on Sight: Swollen Upper Extremity in a Patient with End Stage Renal Disease

AV fistula pseudoaneurysmCase: A 45 year old female with end-stage renal disease presents with 2 days of worsening pain, swelling, and color change of her left upper extremity.  The symptoms began after her left arm arteriovenous (AV) fistula was accessed for hemodialysis. The skin is tense and a bruit is present. What is your diagnosis for this swollen upper extremity? Click on the image for a larger view.

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By |2016-12-22T20:07:29-08:00Sep 2, 2014|Cardiovascular, Diagnose on Sight, Ultrasound|
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