SAEM Clinical Image Series: Red, White, & Blue

By |Categories: Dermatology, Emergency Medicine, Environmental, SAEM Clinical Images, Tox & Medications|

A 29-year-old female presented to the emergency department for a rash on her right calf. 5 days prior, at her home in Alabama, the patient developed pain and swelling of her right calf following a spider bite while putting on her pants. The patient felt a “burning pain” and found a spider which she then killed. She went to a hospital and received cephalexin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and oxycodone. Despite taking these medications she continued having aching pain rated 10/10 in her right calf along with generalized pruritus. The patient stated that the bite evolved from an [...]

SplintER Series: A Pain in the Elbow

By |Categories: Expert Peer Reviewed (Clinical), Orthopedic, SplintER|

A 12-year-old male pitcher for a traveling club baseball team complains of acute worsening of right elbow pain that has been bothering him for 3 months. The radiograph is shown below (Frontal elbow view. Case courtesy of Dr. Levente István Lánczi, Radiopaedia.org, rID: 46853). What is your diagnosis? What causes this injury? What patient demographic is most susceptible to this injury? How can this injury be prevented? What is the management of this injury in the Emergency Department?   […]

  • Pneumothorax Differential

Is it a Pneumothorax? An Unusual Post-Thoracentesis Radiograph

By |Categories: Pulmonary|

  A 51-year-old female with a history of metastatic ovarian cancer on chemotherapy, malignant pleural effusions requiring repeat thoracentesis, and pulmonary embolism presented to the Emergency Department with worsening shortness of breath and dry cough. Upon arrival, she was hypoxic with an oxygen saturation level of 75% on room air. She was tachycardic, tachypneic, and her blood pressure was 125/56 mmHg. Labs revealed only a mild anemia (Hgb: 10.2). It was determined that her symptoms were secondary to recurrent right-sided malignant pleural effusions. Her presenting chest X-ray is pictured above (Image 1: Author’s own image). […]

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Man vs Pneumatic Nail Gun

By |Categories: Emergency Medicine, SAEM Clinical Images, Trauma|

A 40-year-old male presents with injury to his left hand by a nail gun. While at work, the patient accidentally shot himself with a nail gun. The nail went through pneumatic air hose tubing, his third finger, and his thumb, keeping them all connected. He immediately felt uncomfortable in his left arm, and, upon arrival to the emergency department (ED), complained of swelling in his left arm extending to his neck. He feels shortness of breath and “fullness” in his throat. […]

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Worsening Sore Throat

By |Categories: Emergency Medicine, ENT, SAEM Clinical Images|

A 40-year-old  male presented to the emergency department (ED) complaining of a sore throat for one week. The patient had presented ten days earlier following a stab wound to the anterior neck that violated the platysma. There was no vascular injury noted on the computed tomography angiography (CTA) but there was extensive soft tissue damage with emphysema extending into the retropharyngeal space. The patient underwent a flexible laryngoscopy by ENT, which showed no airway injury. He was observed in the intensive care unit for two days, then discharged. Following discharge, the patient had progressive sore [...]

Purple Urine Bag Syndrome: A visual diagnosis and what it means for your patient

By |Categories: Diagnose on Sight, Genitourinary|

A 78-year-old male is brought in from his nursing home for evaluation of hypotension. He has a prior history of multiple strokes and is bed bound. He arrives febrile, tachycardic, and hypotensive. On your physical exam, you notice that he has an indwelling foley catheter. The catheter tubing and bag have a vibrant purple color. You wonder if this unusual urine color could be caused by something insidious. Could this be related to a toxin, medication, or infection? […]

SAEM Clinical Image Series: Distended Abdomen after ROSC

By |Categories: Critical Care/ Resus, Gastrointestinal, SAEM Clinical Images, Uncategorized|

A 64-year-old female presented to the emergency department (ED) in cardiac arrest. Her family members heard her fall in the bathroom and started CPR. EMS intubated the patient and 20 minutes of CPR was done en route. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved after fifteen minutes of resuscitation in the ED. At baseline, the patient ambulated with her walker and was conversant. She was having abdominal pain and nausea for the past three days after recently being diagnosed with a urinary tract infection. On arrival to the ED, the patient was pulseless with ventricular [...]

IDEA Series: 3D-printed pediatric lumbar puncture trainer

By |Categories: IDEA series, Medical Education, Neurology, Pediatrics, Simulation|

Pediatric lumbar puncture trainers are less available than adult trainers; most are the newborn size and quite expensive. Due to age-based practice patterns for fever diagnostic testing, most pediatric lumbar punctures are performed on young infants, and residents have fewer opportunities to perform lumbar punctures on older children.1 Adult lumbar puncture trainers have been created using a 3D-printed spine and ballistics gel, which allows for ultrasound guidance.2 No previous model has been described for pediatric lumbar puncture. […]