• AP ankle radiograph

EMRad: Radiologic Approach to the Traumatic Ankle

By |Categories: EMRad, Orthopedic, Radiology, Trauma|

Radiology teaching during medical school is variable, ranging from informal teaching to required clerkships [1].​​ Many of us likely received an approach to a chest x-ray, but approaches to other studies may or may not have not been taught. We can do better! Enter EM:Rad, a series aimed at providing “just in time” approaches to commonly ordered radiology studies in the emergency department. When applicable, it will provide pertinent measurements specific to management, and offer a framework for when to get an additional view, if appropriate. We recently covered the elbow and wrist. Now: the ankle. […]

  • gastrostomy tube g-tube

Trick of the Trade: Deflate an Undeflatable Gastrostomy Tube

By |Categories: Gastrointestinal, Tricks of the Trade|

A 54-year-old female with a past medical history of throat cancer presents for gastrostomy tube (G-tube) replacement. The initial G-tube was placed 3 years ago. Most recently, the patient had the G-tube changed 7 months ago. She presents to the Emergency Department because the G-tube is leaking from the tubing that is external to the skin. When you attempt to deflate the cuff, you are unsuccessful. […]

  • EMS fellowship

Navigating Life After Residency: 10 Lessons I Learned in EMS Fellowship

By |Categories: EMS, Professional Development|

The transition from residency to your first job or fellowship is an exciting time in any career. New opportunities for professional growth appear, but with them come a new and unique set of challenges. Transitioning from a structured clinical environment to more independent work and self-driven projects can be a difficult transition. For this reason, we wanted to share a few lessons we’ve learned. Although this advice is derived from our experience in EMS fellowship, we expect that it will apply and be helpful to other upcoming fellows and all people stepping away from residency to enter the workforce. [...]

  • tibial tubercle fractures

SplintER: Knee pain after the jump

By |Categories: Expert Peer Reviewed (Clinical), Orthopedic, Pediatrics, SplintER|Tags: |

A 15 year-old male presents to the emergency department with left knee pain and swelling after jumping while attempting to dunk a basketball. You obtain a knee x-ray (image 1 courtesy of Mark Hopkins, MD). What is your diagnosis? What patient population is at risk for this injury? What other injuries occur in this anatomical location? What is your emergency department management? […]

SplintER Series: Two cases of shoulder pain

By |Categories: Emergency Medicine, Orthopedic, SplintER|

  Two patients present to your emergency department: Patient 1 is a 17 year-old soccer player who fell during a game onto their right side and is now complaining of mild right shoulder pain. You obtain x-rays (Figure 1). Patient 2 is a 21 year-old motorist who lost control and went over the handlebars. They heard a pop and are complaining of left shoulder pain. You obtain shoulder x-rays (Figure 2). For these cases, what are your diagnoses, expected physical examination findings, and emergency department management? […]

Trick of the Trade: Tracheostomy leak temporization

By |Categories: ENT, Tricks of the Trade|

Patients who are tracheostomy and ventilator dependent are at increased risk for complications the longer they remain in this condition. One common complication is tracheomalacia. Progressive tracheomalacia can lead to air leaks around the tracheostomy cannula balloon. Initially, this can be managed by placing a longer tracheostomy cannula deeper into the trachea, however, these are often unavailable in the emergency department [1]. A second line strategy is to temporarily over-inflate the balloon, however, with chronic overinflation, eventually both the trachea and the neck stoma become too large, leading to an inability to maintain appropriate positive pressure (PEEP) and tidal volume [...]

Gaining the Diagnosis of Vitreous Hemorrhage with Ultrasound

By |Categories: Ophthalmology, Ultrasound|

A 54 year-old male presents to the emergency department with an eye complaint. The patient works as a cook and while cleaning the grill several hours ago felt something fly into his eye. He did not immediately feel pain, but notes blurred vision and an increasing pressure-like sensation in his left eye. He describes his left-sided blurred vision as a haziness, like cobwebs over his eye. He has been able to open his eye and keep it open without difficulty. […]

ALiEM AIR | Respiratory 2019 Module

By |Categories: ALiEMU, Approved Instructional Resources (AIR series), Pulmonary|

Welcome to the AIR Respiratory Module! After carefully reviewing all relevant posts from the top 50 sites of the Social Media Index, the ALiEM AIR Team is proud to present the highest quality online content related to respiratory emergencies. 8 blog posts within the past 12 months (as of November 2019) met our standard of online excellence and were curated and approved for residency training by the AIR Series Board. We identified 2 AIR and 6 Honorable Mentions. We recommend programs give 4 hours (about 30 minutes per article) of III credit for this module. […]